Jack in the Box, Wendy’s to outsource drive-through order-takers

10:11 AM CST on Tuesday, January 27, 2009

HOUSTON—Next time you pull up to a fast-food drive-through, the voice you hear could be miles away.

Some restaurant chains, including Jack in the Box and Wendy’s, are giving outsourcing a try.

Orders will be taken from a call center instead of at the restaurants themselves.

The centers will be staffed with dozens of workers.

Jack in the Box said the goal is to be more efficient and accurate, but critics said it’s a way for restaurants to cut jobs.

http://www.khou.com/business/stories/khou090127_tnt_outsourcing.b3bef88.html

Chain Outsources Drive-Through Orders

UPDATED: 10:52 am EST January 27, 2009

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A fast-food giant is trying to determine whether its easier to place your drive-through order with someone around the world instead of around the corner.
Jack in the Box Inc. has been testing a program in some Charlotte-area restaurants that outsources order-taking to a call center elsewhere.
Company spokeswoman Kathleen Anthony told the Charlotte Observer that the technology is intended to improve speed, accuracy and service.

The San Diego-based restaurant chain hopes the process will free up on-site employees to process orders, accept payment and address other needs.
Anthony said the orders are routed to a Texas call center operated by Bronco Communications, and she said some orders may be routed outside of the country.

http://www.wyff4.com/news/18564258/detail.html

Fast-food industry tests outsourcing

Published: January 26, 2009

CHARLOTTE – A fast-food giant has been trying to determine whether it’s easier to place your drive-through order with someone around the world instead of around the corner.

Jack in the Box Inc. has been outsourcing order-taking for some Charlotte-area restaurants to a call center elsewhere, testing whether the idea could improve efficiency.

Company spokeswoman Kathleen Anthony said that the technology is intended to improve speed, accuracy and service. Jack in the Box, which is based in San Diego, hopes the process will free up on-site employees to process orders and accept payment.

“It is something we’re testing, not something we’re necessarily committed to at this point,” said Anthony, who wouldn’t discuss the results of the Charlotte trial that began in the middle of last year.

Anthony said that the orders are routed to a Texas call center operated by Bronco Communications, and she said some orders may be routed outside of the country.

Restaurants including McDonald’s and Wendy’s franchisees have tried centralizing orders but neither has used the program nationally because they have found it difficult to prove that it saves money, said Sherri Daye Scott, the editor of QSR Magazine, a quick-service restaurant-industry publication.

Customers in Charlotte have noticed heavy accents among order-takers only to find different workers at the drive-through window.

“I had noticed it (several months ago), but I just thought the person taking the order was somewhere else in the store where we couldn’t see them,” customer Elizabeth Banks said. “It never occurred to me they might be out of the country.”

Kate Mosteller, the marketing director of Exit 41, which focuses on off-site order taking, said the technology can help eliminate barriers between customers and employees who speak different languages. But it can also be difficult to match order-takers with customers who may have different dialects or expectations.

http://www2.journalnow.com/content/2009/jan/26/fast-food-industry-tests-outsourcing/news/

We Will Reverse the Epidemic of Childhood Obesity – Report

rwjf_ar2006_presidentsmessage

An excerpt from the report:

In 1965, 43 percent of us smoked cigarettes.17
Today only 20.9 percent of us light up.18
In 1982, drunk drivers killed about 22,000 people.
In 2005, the toll had fallen to just over 12,000.19
In 1983, only 24 percent of us used seatbelts.20
Today 82 percent of us buckle up.21
These statistics tell a story of radical transformations in
individual behavior that were impossible to achieve without
simultaneous policy, social and cultural change.

The lives saved are countless and the misery avoided is incalculable,
all because the country chose to change to survive.
Now it is time to do it again, and the stakes are even higher.
When David Satcher was Surgeon General, he said,
“Overweight and obesity may soon cause as much preventable
disease and death as cigarette smoking.”22
A controversial prophesy, certainly, but one America cannot
afford to ignore. The growing body of evidence is too powerful.