ACTION ALERT | Support Progressive Action on Pollution and Climate Change | Drive-thrus

What can you do?

Comox Council is currently considering a ban on all future drive-thru developments which has resulted in a re-launch of the industry’s drive-thru ‘truths’ greenwash campaign from 2008.

The poster (attached) brought to you by the Comox Drive-Thru Restaurant Coalition (Canadian Restaurant and Foodservices Association & the TDL Group)asks citizens to call the councillors and tell them banning drive-thrus are a bad idea.

Instead let’s contact Comox City Hall at 250-339-2202 and tell them banning drive-thrus demonstrates much needed leadership on climate change and air pollution!!!

Mayors and councillors who have the moral courage to fight for change and take on industry need our support!

See the recycled (from London) greenwashing campaign for Comox at www.drivethrufacts.ca

For the real story on drive-thrus visit: https://drivethrulies.wordpress.com/the-need-to-start-somewhere/

Current stats on air pollution and climate change can be found below.

Mayor

Paul Ives

250-334-2416

pives@comox.ca

Councillor

Russ Arnott

250-339-2569

rarnott@comox.ca

Councillor

Ray Crossley

250-339-9565

rcrossley@comox.ca

Councillor

Patti Fletcher

250-339-2255

pfletcher@comox.ca

Councillor

Ken Grant

250-339-1355

kgrant@comox.ca

Councillor

Tom Grant

250-339-7761

tgrant@comox.ca

Councillor

Marcia Turner

250-339-0167

mturner@comox.ca

https://drivethrulies.wordpress.com/

“Climate policy is characterized by the habituation of low expectations and a culture of failure. There is an urgent need to understand global warming and the tipping points for dangerous impacts that we have already crossed as a sustainability emergency that takes us beyond the politics of failure-inducing compromise. We are now in a race between climate tipping points and political tipping points.”
David Spratt, Philip Sutton, Climate Code Red, Australia, Published July, 2008

The Numbers:

  • Ontario’s smog causes 9,500 deaths per year, medical association says. Of these 1,000 occurred immediately after times of intense pollution.
  • The research on the human costs of pollution and pollution-related diseases estimated that around 21,000 people in Canada will die from breathing in toxic substances drifting in the air this year with 3,000 of those deaths due to short-term exposure to smog.
  • By 2031, short term exposure to air pollution will claim close to 90,000 lives in Canada, while long-term exposure will kill more than 700,000, the report said.
  • Ontario and Quebec residents are the worst hit Canadians, with 70 percent of the premature deaths occurring in Central Canada.
  • In the past 15 years alone, there has been a fourfold increase in asthma in children under 15 in Canada.
  • OMA estimates for annual premature deaths (2130) due to smog in Toronto alone were almost three times the number of deaths (831) Health Canada attributes to secondhand smoke exposure for the whole of Canada.
  • In 2008, 80 per cent of those who die due to air pollution will be over 65.
  • 25 Canadians under 19 will die from short-term acute pollution exposure this year.
  • Children are the most vulnerable breathing 50% more air per pound than adults.
  • A child’s breathing zone is lower than adults so they are more exposed to vehicle exhausts and heavier pollutants that concentrate at lower levels in the air.
  • In 2008 there will more than 9,000 hospital visits and 30,000 emergency room visits, and 620,000 doctor’s office visits, stemming from air pollution.
  • Eight thousand people a day die from air pollution. There are 3 million annual deaths, worldwide.
  • Emissions from an individual idling a car in London, will emit nearly the same amount of emissions volume as the total annual emissions from an individual in Bangladesh.
  • More than 20 million people have been displaced by climate-related sudden-onset natural disasters in 2008 alone, according to a new study by OCHA and the Norwegian Refugee Council’s (NRC) Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre.
  • The total number of people affected by natural disasters due to accelerating climate change has risen sharply over the past 10 years, with an average of 211 million people directly affected each year, nearly five times the number impacted by conflict in the same period.
  • April 2009: CO2 hits 800,000-year high at Mauna Loa Observatory Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (USA) Atmospheric CO2 reached 389.47 parts per million (ppm).
  • Wednesday June 10th– co2 went up again. It is now at 390.18
  • The human respiratory system can only handle an upper level of 426 ppmv before the blood begins to become acidic after long-term exposure.

The Costs:

  • The national economy: air pollution will top eight billion dollars in 2008, and by 2031 it will go over 250 billion.
  • The Ontario Medical Association estimated that health care costs caused by poor air quality in 2000 would amount to nearly $630 million, not to mention the $566 million in costs due to workers taking sick days.
  • In Ontario alone, lost productivity will cost Canada $349,400 this year. By 2031 that will total over $9 million in damage.
  • Healthcare costs in the province will be $221,800 this year, up to almost $6.5 million total by 2031.
  • Economic damage to quality of life will hit $194,100 in Ontario in 2008, up to $265,000 in 2031 and totalling almost $5.5 million by that time.
  • Economic damage due to loss of life will cost $3,644,100 in 2008, rising to $6,367,200 in 2031, and totalling $115,674,500 by 2031.

comox_drivethrough_flyer.pdf

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